Central Plains Satelite

Notice of Hearing — Antelope County Supervisors

April 4, 2013 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

NOTICE OF MEETING OF COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS AS A COUNTY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION OF ANTELOPE COUNTY, NEBRASKA
Notice is hereby given that the County Board of Supervisors of Antelope County, Nebraska will hold a County Board of Equalization meeting in the County Supervisor’s room in the Antelope County Courthouse annex in Neligh, Nebraska on April 9, 2013 at 9:30 AM for the purpose of discussing and/or taking action on the court order regarding the Nebraska Unified School District #1 2010/2011 budget; approve/deny tax list corrections as well as various other items that may need to be addressed.  Said meeting will be open to the public.  An agenda for the meeting, kept continuously current, is available for public inspection at the Antelope County Clerk’s office.
Publish: April 3, 2013
ZNEZ

Notice — City of Elgin

April 4, 2013 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

Backflow Prevention and the Customer
Helping Keep Our Water Safe!!
Nebraska’s Safe Drinking Water Act requires water systems to implement an on-going cross connection control program.  An important part of this program is public education.  It is believed that a well-informed public will be more aware of the possibility of cross connections within their property and will take reasonable and sensible precautions to avoid creating cross connections on their property.  This brochure is intended to explain what a cross connection is, what causes it, what some of the consequences can be, and how it can be prevented.
What is cross connection?
A cross connection occurs whenever there is an actual or potential physical connection between the public drinking water system and any possible source of contamination.
Sources of contamination can include both high hazard materials, which can cause illness or death, and low or non-hazardous materials which are mainly just a nuisance and can cause the water to look, taste or smell unpleasant.  Although the high hazards are the primary concern in a cross connection control program, your water utility strives to provide both safe and good quality water to its customers.  Whenever there is a loss of pressure in the public water supply, these cross connections can allow unsafe substances to enter the public water supply.
What causes cross connections?
Cross connections can be caused by both permanent and temporary “piping”.  An example of a cross connection being permanently piped in is the drain on a water softener.  Many times these discharge lines are connected directly to the sewer line without any type of protection.  Hot tub and whirlpool fill pipes and swimming pool and broiler make-up lines are other examples of permanently piped cross connections.
The most common example of a temporary piped cross connection is the common garden hose.  It is estimated that 90% of all cross connections are caused by the inappropriate use of garden hoses.  Garden hoses are frequently used to apply fertilizer and pesticides to lawns and gardens.  They are also used to fill swimming pools, wash cars, and in rural areas, they are often used to fill stock tanks for watering cattle, horses, and other livestock.
Other temporary piping cross connections occur when hoses are used to fill waterbeds or are connected to utility sinks to fill wash tubs or mop buckets.
What are the consequences of cross connections?
The consequences of cross connections can range from something as simple as “dirty water” to something as severe as serious illness or even death.  There are many recorded instances of non-hazardous contamination of public water supplies caused by cross connections.  In one case, a line used for cleaning a distilling vat in a wine bottling company was left open, and an entire vat of wine flowed back into the public water system.  Although this was not a health hazard, and most of the customers liked the water they drank, this cross connection could have had far deadlier results if it had been something other than wine in the vat.
There are many instances recorded where people have been made seriously ill or even died due to cross connections.  There have been cases where dysentery diarrhea, hepatitis and even polio have been contracted as a direct result of a cross connection.
How can cross connections be prevented?
The best way to prevent cross connections is for each customer to examine the plumbing on their premises and look for any permanent or temporary piped cross connections.  Any time there is the possibility of a cross connection between the water supply and any hazardous or unknown substance, there should be an air gap between the faucet and the questionable use.
In cases where this is not possible, as with a garden hose, a proper backflow prevention device or assembly should be installed on the supply faucet.  This will protect both the public water supply and the inhabitants of the building from contamination.
In situations where extremely high hazards exist in a building or location, it is sometimes necessary to contain that entire system from the public water supply with a backflow preventer to protect the public water supply from the substances being used on that site.
What you can do to prevent cross connections and keep your drinking water safe.
1. Check your faucets to be sure that all faucet endpoints are above the flood level of the sink, tub, basin, or other apparatus they supply.
2. Protect faucet extensions by installing proper backflow prevention devices (i.e. hose bib vacuum breakers) on all faucets capable of having a hose or other extension attached.
3. Check drain lines (refrigerator drink dispensers, water softeners, heat exchangers, etc.) to be sure there is an adequate air gap between the drain line and the floor drain or sewer line into which they discharge.
4. Never use unprotected faucets to fill non-drinking water containers (i.e. water beds, wading pools, stock tanks, hot tubs, etc.)
Following these guide lines and using common sense will help to eliminate the possibility of you contaminating your drinking water, your neighbor’s drinking water and your community’s drinking water.  This not only affects the residents of your community, but their visitors and those people who are passing through.
Publish: April 3, 2013
ZNEZ

Scholarship Fund Surpasses $2,000 in Donations

April 4, 2013 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

Donations have surpassed $2,000 for the 2013 Elgin Scholarship Drive sponsored by the Elgin Area Community Foundation.
Altogether, $2,075 has been collected so far to be used to finance scholarships for students in 2013. Donations raised before April 30 will be eligible for matching funds. The match is given by the Colonel Barney Oldfield and Vada Kinman Trust. Recent donations have been received from Barb & Ken Bode, Kyle & Deb Warren, Dennis & Janette Henn, Phyllis Kinney, Sharon Wilkinson, Gary Hoefer, Jerry & Janice Heithoff, Craig & Merry Sprout, Karen Eischeid, Louie & Darlene Heithoff in memory of Bud Hawks; and David Currie in memory of Bill Bergstrom.

For the complete story, subscribe to The Elgin Review

Schroeder Supports ECF Efforts During Elgin Visit

April 4, 2013 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

The Elgin Community Foundation took another forward in its pursuit of working towards a better future for the community last week.
Members of the foundation hosted a visit by Craig Schroeder, senior fellow director of youth engagement with the RUPRI Center for Rural Entrepreneurship based out of Lincoln.
Schroeder was in Elgin for two days, meeting with students from Elgin Public and Pope John schools on career prep activities, and later with five local business owners.
“His talks with the kids were very supportive,” ECF President Todd Heithoff said, “as a vast majority of them said that if they had the opportunity to return to Elgin after high school/college they would. Part of insuring that is Elgin working as a community and with local business owners to ensure there are opportunities for younger people to come home to.”

For the complete story, subscribe to The Elgin Review

City Pledges $5,000 Towards New Pool Fund

April 4, 2013 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

When it was constructed back in 1960, it was state-of-the-art. Now, more than 50 years later, the Elgin Swimming Pool, while functional, is showing its age.
At Monday night’s meeting of the Elgin City Council, two members of the Elgin Ko-ed Group (EKG) stepped forward with a fundraising plan which, down the road, could pay for a new pool.
Michael Moser and Todd Heithoff told Council members the EKG is initiating a fund drive to raise funds to cover the costs for a new pool to be constructed sometime in the next five to 10 years.
“We want to get started so we have some funds available,” he said.
Heithoff said the EKG was formed to help with the Q125 celebration. He said the non-profit organization will continue to exist after the Q125 celebration and wants to make a donantions towards a new pool. He said with the farm economy good, donations could come in.
They asked the Council to pledge some funds to kickoff the fundraising campaign. An account has been established at the Bank of Elgin for persons wishing to donate to the pool fund.
Councilman Ken Jochum said the city’s focus at the moment is a new water well. He, and other council members, were supportive of the pool campaign. To that end, the council pledged $5,000 to come from the pool, park & youth fund, towards the pool fund.

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