Central Plains Satelite

Two-Vehicle Accident North Of Elgin Claims Life Of South Dakota Man

December 2, 2016 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

Antelope County Sheriff Bob Moore (with clipboard), the Nebraska State Patrol and members of Elgin Fire & Rescue were at the scene. E-R photo

Antelope County Sheriff Bob Moore (with clipboard), the Nebraska State Patrol and members of Elgin Fire & Rescue were at the scene. E-R photo

A two-vehicle accident north of Elgin Friday morning claimed the life of a South Dakota man.
Acting Antelope County Coroner Joe Smith said Drew Holter died as a result of injuries sustained in the accident at the intersection of 841 Road and Highway 14. The accident occurred around 9:45 a.m.

Holter, 24, of Platte, S.D., was headed eastbound on 841 Road when he collided with a semi-trailer truck heading north on Highway 14. The semi-trailer truck was being driven by a Clearwater man, 64-year-old Roy Rogers. Rogers was taken by Elgin Ambulance to Antelope Memorial Hospital.
The semi-trailer truck struck the passenger side of Holter’s pickup.
According to the Nebraska State Patrol, Holter was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident. The accident remains under investigation by the State Patrol.
Smith said Friday afternoon that an autopsy on Holter will be conducted Saturday in Omaha.
Holter, living northwest of Elgin, was a wind turbine technician at Invenergy LLC in Elgin.
Traffic was stopped for a period of time as a result of the accident.
Responding to the accident were the Elgin Fire & Rescue, the State Patrol and the Antelope County Sheriff’s Department.
E-R photos

Truck involved in Friday's two-vehicle accident. E-R photo

Truck involved in Friday's two-vehicle accident. E-R photo

PJCC, EHS One Acts Among Best At Districts

December 1, 2016 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

PJCC finish 2nd, EHS 3rd at Districts.  E-R photos

PJCC finish 2nd, EHS 3rd at Districts. E-R photos

Pope John Central Catholic and Elgin High Schools were among the best at the Class D2-2 One-Act Play Competition held Wednesday at Leigh.
Leigh High School earned 178 points from three judges to place first and advance to State. They performed “Young Frankenstein”.
Pope John took second with 174 points, just four points behind the winning team with their performance of “The Perils of Lulu.”
Elgin High School, performing “13 Signs You Should Stop Being a Pirate” finished in third place with 167 points.

Earning outstanding action awards were:
Elgin Public — Jaime Hoefer, Hayes Miller, Taya Voborny, Kenneth Bush, Zoey Bergman
Elgin Pope John — Brody Hupp, Madison Dilly, Logan Henn, Nicki Payne, Maddie Schrage

Rounding out the field were Lyons-Decatur Northeast - fourth; Lindsay Holy Family - fifth; Clarkson - sixth, St. Edward - seventh; and Newman Grove - eighth.
Leigh will compete at state against teams from Ansley, Niobrara, Hyannis, Thedford and Hampton.
The 2016 NSAA State Play Production Championships will be held Wednesday, Dec. 7, at the Johnny Carson Theatre in Norfolk.

The PJCC One Act team with their 2nd place plaque. Submitted

The PJCC One Act team with their 2nd place plaque. Submitted

Bargain Box Keeps Giving Back To The Community

November 30, 2016 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

Back room at the Elgin Bargain Box. E-R photo

Back room at the Elgin Bargain Box. E-R photo

By Lynell Morgan
Co-Publisher
The legend of Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men is full of stories of a man and his group who “take from the rich and give to the poor”. While he and his band may be mythical, the spirit of giving, of using things from people who don’t need them to help those in need is alive and well, especially in this small community of Elgin.
In Elgin, our band of thieves is anything but criminal and they don’t hide out in a forest. They go by a business name, are located in a downtown building and spread goodwill and their profits throughout the area.
Elgin’s Bargain Box has only been in operation for 2 years and 3 months. To date, they have given back to communities, organizations and individuals in need over $76,000. That averages to over $2,800 per month that has been donated.
One of their most recent donations was $2,000 to the Elgin Community Center for a a new steam table and other much-needed items. They also presented $5,000 to go towards the bathhouse being built at the new Elgin swimming pool.
Those Who Give
Co-founder of the Bargain Box, Linda Kerkman, speaking on behalf of the business, sings the praises of the generous people who donate their goods to the thrift store, allowing them to give back.
“As people have witnessed our generosity, they have found greater generosity in their own life,” Kerkman told the Elgin Review. She summed it up noting that “the most joyful, peaceful people you know are generous people. They don’t count that cost to themselves, they give to the Jesus they see in the poor, in each other”.
As the Bargain Box plans for 2017 and beyond, they are looking at additional ways of helping, thinking outside of “the box” if you will. Kerkman says one area they would like to focus on is the needs of the older population in the area.
“A friend of mine who also is involved with a thrift shop in Nebraska says that their organization looks for ways to keep the elderly at home - in their own home,” she explained. A local friend, Julie Borer, told her about the number of elderly people who just miss qualifying for much needed services.
“There are people who were right above the Medicaid guidelines; they didn’t qualify for Medicaid but they were still low on funds and couldn’t afford their Lifeline. So, we sent a sizable grant down to the Area Agency on Aging for the strict purpose of using it for those who can’t afford their Lifeline.” Kerkman said that grant was made within the last ten days. They have also donated an additional $500 each to the Boone and Antelope county food pantries to purchase turkeys and hams. Monthly, the Bargain Box donates $300 to each of the food pantries.
Other projects they would like to explore include perhaps working with another entity to organize a “taxi”-type service for older residents. This service would utilize volunteers to take them to doctor appointments and other necessary trips both in and out of town.
Those Who Buy
As we look towards the season of giving, the Bargain Box has given to some who perhaps couldn’t afford to purchase many gifts, the opportunity to give good quality items, some barely used, some never used.
“I think people are most surprised by the price - that never seems to go away,” Kerkman said.
No one can say that the Bargain Box isn’t affordable. Even the staff is surprised by the volume they must be selling to bring in the amount of money they are dispersing. As she put it, they are either selling a large volume of items or “Jesus is multiplying the coins.”
While most items are clothing, kitchen gadgets and home decor, they have also been given and sold a fireplace, kitchen cabinets and larger furniture. This wide and unique variety has made them a “must stop” for many visiting Elgin and a fun trip when families get together.
“Lots of families come in,” Kerkman said. It has become a destination with especially younger kids. “Lonnie Dinslage’s girls and the grandkids. When Connie Seier’s grandkids get here (Elgin), that’s the first thing they ask about, if they can go to the Bargain Box.”
Christmas Season
In talking about the fast-approaching Christmas holiday, Kerkman said that the Bargain Box was just approached to help with a specific project by the Orphan Grain Train in Norfolk.
“They wanted to know if we could help fund $90 mattresses to go to the Ukraine to an orphanage,” she said. “He would like to order 20 of them.” They have yet to decide how they will help with the mattresses.
Yes, the Bargain Box is giving the money in the form of grants, but it is truly the people who have donated items, and, in turn, shopped at the Bargain Box who are being so generous.
“I told Abby (at the Elgin Community Center) that when she told the people about the gift, that she should thank them for shopping with us, because now we have the money to give back to them. They bought their own steam table!”
As they count their blessings this Christmas season, top on their list is their volunteers.
“If we didn’t have the volunteers, we wouldn’t be open as many hours,” she said. “We knew when we started that if we didn’t have the volunteers, we would have to cut back. The number of the volunteers have seemed to increase, along with the confidence of those who work.”
Another key part of their success has been the availability of the building they use. Owned by Tami Schrage of Raeville, Schrage worked with the group from the start, allowing them to make necessary changes and practically giving them a green light to do what was needed to make the old Blair Motors building work for them.
Be sure you add the Bargain Box to your regular “must shop at” list when in downtown Elgin.
Not only might you find a hidden treasure or a relic from your childhood but each penny spent goes to a wonderful cause.
xxxx
The legend of Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men is full of stories of a man and his group who “take from the rich and give to the poor”. While he and his band may be mythical, the spirit of giving, of using things from people who don’t need them to help those in need is alive and well, especially in this small community of Elgin.
In Elgin, our band of thieves is anything but criminal and they don’t hide out in a forest. They go by a business name, are located in a downtown building and spread goodwill and their profits throughout the area.
Elgin’s Bargain Box has only been in operation for two years and three months. To date, they have given back to communities, organizations and individuals in need over $76,000. That averages to over $2,800 per month that has been donated back.
One of their most recent donations was $2,000 to the Elgin Community Center for a a new steam table and other much-needed items. They also presented $5,000 to go towards the bathhouse being built at the new Elgin swimming pool.
Those Who Give
Co-founder of the Bargain Box Linda Kerkman, speaking on behalf of the business, sings the praises of the generous people who donate their goods to the thrift store, allowing them to give back.
“As people have witnessed our generosity they have found greater generosity in their own life,” Kerkman told the Elgin Review. She summed it up noting that “the most joyful, peaceful people you know are generous people. They don’t count that cost to themselves, they give to the Jesus they see in the poor, in each other”.
As the Bargain Box plans for 2017 and beyond, they are looking at additional ways of helping, thinking outside of “the box” if you will. Kerkman says one area they would like to focus on is the needs of the older population in the area.
“A friend of mine who also is involved with a thrift shop in Nebraska says that their organization looks for ways to keep the elderly at home - in their own home,” she explained. A local friend, Julie Borer, told her about the number of elderly people who just miss qualifying for much needed services.
“There are people who were right above the Medicaid guidelines, they didn’t qualify for Medicaid but they were still low on funds and couldn’t afford their lifeline. So we sent a sizable grant down to the Area Agency on Aging for the strict purpose of using it for those who can’t afford their lifeline.” Kerkman said that grant was made within the last ten days. They have also donated an additional $500 each to the Boone and Antelope county food pantries to purchase turkeys and hams. Monthly, the Bargain Box donates $250 to each of the food pantries.
Other projects they would like to explore include a “taxi”-type service for older residents to take them to doctor appointments and other necessary trips both in and out of town.
Those Who Buy
As we look towards the season of giving, the Bargain Box has given to some who perhaps couldn’t afford to purchase many gifts the opportunity to give good quality items, some barely used, some never used.
“I think people are most surprised by the price - that never seems to go away,” Kerkman said.
No one can say that the Bargain Box isn’t affordable. Even the staff is surprised by the volume they must be selling to bring in the amount of money they are dispersing. As she put it, they are either selling a large volume of items or “Jesus is multiplying the coins.”
While most items are clothing, kitchen gadgets and home decor, they have also been given and sold a fireplace, kitchen cabinets and larger furniture. This wide and unique variety has made them a “must stop” for many visiting Elgin and a fun trip when families get together.
“Lots of families come in,” Kerkman said. It has become a destination with especially younger kids. “Lonnie Dinslage’s girls and the grandkids. Connie Seier that when her grandkids get here (Elgin) that’s the first thing they ask about, if they can go to the Bargain Box.”
Christmas Season
In talking about the fast-approaching Christmas holiday, Kerkman said that the Bargain Box has been approached to help with a specific project by the Orphan Grain Train in Norfolk.
“They wanted to know if we could help fund $90 mattresses to go to the Ukraine to an orphanage,” she said. “He would like to order 20 of them. A little bit of a pricey thing but, when we get Heaven, think of how many people who are going to somehow know that we have helped them. We, the town of Elgin! There are all kinds of little pockets of goodness like Elgin.”
Yes, the Bargain Box is giving the money in the form of grants but it is truly the people who have donated items and, in turn, shopped at the Bargain Box who are being so generous.
“I told Abby (at the Elgin Community Center) that when she told the people about the gift, that she should thank them for shopping with us, because now we have the money to give back to them. They bought their own steam table!”
As they count their blessings this Christmas season, top on their list is their volunteers.
“If we didn’t have the volunteers, we wouldn’t be open as many hours,” she said. “We knew when we started that if we didn’t have the volunteers, we would have to cut back. The number of the volunteers have seemed to increase, along with the confidence of those who work.”
Another key part of their success has been the availability of the building they use. Owned by Tami Schrage of Raeville, Schrage worked with the group from the start, allowing them to make necessary changes and practically giving them a green light to do what was needed to make the old Blair Motors building work for them.
Be sure you add the Bargain Box to your regular “must shop at” list when in downtown Elgin. Not only might you find a hidden treasure or a relic from your childhood but each penny spent goes to a wonderful cause.

Turnout Exceeds Expectations For Thanksgiving Bazaar

November 30, 2016 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

stbonifacethanksgivingbazaar

More than 1,400 people feasted on some of the best Thanksgiving foods Thursday at the 92nd annual St. Boniface Bazaar.
Lines extended out the front door of St. Boniface gymnasium from the moment the bazaar began through much of the time food was served.
Altogether, 1,254 dinners were served inside the gymnasium and another 160 carry-out meals were prepared for a total of 1,414 meals.
According to organizers, the total was 464 more meals than last year when the bazaar was held under icy conditions. The total was also 186 more than the number served two years ago.
“This year we served more than the four years since we’ve been just one meal,” according to Michele Reicks. “We think the people who couldn’t come last year because of the ice, were craving our meal for two years and weren’t going to miss it.”
Food Chairperson Sandy Kallhoff shared some numbers which reflect the increase in numbers from previous years.
She said 370 people were served with the first sitting, in 45 minutes.
She said the 160 carry outs were a record number when compared to previous years.
So how does it all break down?
• 43 turkeys
• 535 pounds of sausage
• 130 pounds of rib meat for sauerkraut
• 28 gallons of sauerkraut
• 12 batches of dressing
• 50 gallons of corn
• 13 gallons of cranberries
• 1,215 pieces of dessert
• 1,100 dinner rolls
Late that afternoon, raffle drawings were held. The grand prize, a Bose wave sound touch musical system, was won by Judsen Sehi. Logan Henn was the winner of the Yeti Tundra Cooler and Ice Paks. Carol Mescher’s name was drawn for the St. Boniface Quilter’s quilt.

CVA Announces New Board Of Directors

November 29, 2016 by lmorgan · Comments Off 

Central Valley Ag Cooperative (CVA) recently hosted their Annual Meeting for member-owners to review the fiscal year, and to announce the new elected members of their Board of Directors. CVA relies on it’s Board of Directors to position CVA for future success and profitability for member-owners. The CVA Board of Directors is made up of local, agricultural producers who are recognized for their industry expertise, as well as economic and community development skills. CVA member-owners elected the following individuals to represent their voice on the board; Ryan Crumly – Region 1, Kurt Thoene – Region 2, Paul Jarecke – Region 3, Neal Bracht – Region 4, Jeff Berggren – Region 5 and Doug Moon – Region 6.

“I would like to congratulate our newly elected board of director members, we believe that the Cooperative business model requires a balanced approach and our board plays an integral role in CVA’s performance,” said Dave Beckman, Chairman of the Board of Directors for CVA. “In addition to congratulating our newly elected members, I would like to thank our departing board of director members Rod Heiss, Byron Neinhueser and Mike Bergen for their dedication to CVA over the years.”

At the meeting, CVA reported $15.04 Million in Local Net Profit, $27.3 Million in Total Profit and returned $8.0 Million in patronage to member-owners with 50% paid in cash and the balance in Non-Qualified Equity. Over the 2016 fiscal year $8.1 Million was paid out in cash patronage, equity redemptions, and estates. The amount paid out in cash to CVA member-owners now stands at $62.6 Million over the past five years. Not only is the cash received as a benefit for member-owners; $40.7 Million was reinvested in assets to improve speed, space, and efficiency in 2016. CVA has now spent $213.8 Million over the past five years in assets to better serve its member-owners.

“The Cooperative model continues to perform well and these results could not have been obtained without an outstanding group of employees and the support of our member-owners,” said Beckman.

Central Valley Ag is a farmer-owned cooperative headquartered in York, NE. CVA has locations in Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. CVA is an innovative leader providing products and services in grain, agronomy, feed, and energy.

You can find more information about Central Valley Ag by visiting www.cvacoop.com.

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